Artipelag’s major summer exhibition is an examination of Fornasetti’s creative universe

In 2019, Artipelag will be putting the spotlight on the numerous works of the Italian artist and designer Piero Fornasetti (19131988) by displaying paintings, drawings, graphic design, furniture and other design artefacts, as well as spatial installations. The show will be the first exhibition in Sweden to encompass Fornasetti’s entire output, and it also includes contemporary works made by his son Barnaba Fornasetti. The exhibition FORNASETTI Inside Out Outside In opens on June 14th, 2019.

Piero Fornasetti is perhaps best known as one of the most prominent names in the international world of design, but he has a versatility that encompasses a variety of all aesthetic disciplines such as painting, drawing, graphic design and furniture design. Fornasetti’s creative ideas seem to emerge from a never-ending source and he is considered to be one of the most productive individuals in the history of design, with more than 13,000 artefacts bearing his signature. This versatility is the starting point for his design concept, which is in many respects a philosophical reflection of what it is like to be a human being during the 20th century.

Piero Fornasetti was born in 1913 in Milan, and he remained faithful to the city for most of his life. The duality of Milan, with its historical monuments combined with a modern commercial centre, was an important source of inspiration in Fornasetti’s creative work.

Fornasetti started his career with art studies at the Accademia di Brera in Milan in 1930, which he discontinued prematurely in 1932 since he was unhappy with the tuition. He started to study handicrafts instead but continued to paint for his entire life. His début was in the borderland between painting and handicraft, with printed silk scarves at the Triennale design exhibition in Milan in 1933, which attracted the attention of the architect Giò Ponti. Ponti was one of the most prominent cultural figures of the time, and he was also editor of the magazines Domus and Stile, where Fornasetti was published.

In 1940 Italy was at war, and Fornasetti went into exile in Switzerland from 1943 to 1946. He settled in Switzerland, where he was to focus his interest on drawing, which resulted in pieces including a wonderful series of black and white self-portraits.

After the end of the war, in 1946, Fornasetti returned to Milan, where he resumed his collaboration with Ponti. Together they created an unforgettable number of furniture items, which were designed by Ponti and decorated by Fornasetti. In the period 1949–1952 this collaboration was extended to include full-scale interior design assignments for, among others, Casino San Remo and the cruise ship Andrea Doria.

After his collaboration with Ponti, in the years 1950–1952 Fornasetti further developed his own iconography, not only on furniture and interior furnishings, but also on plates, cups and a variety of other everyday items. The first plate of the series Tema e Variazioni (Themes and Variations), with the famous opera singer Lina Cavalieri’s face in various appearances, was added to the collection in 1951 and became one of Fornasetti’s most successful motifs.

He opened his own shop in Milan in the 1950s, with the aim of reaching a bigger, international audience to make design more democratic in line with the spirit of the age. This formed the basis of Fornasetti’s international breakthrough during the 1960s.

After a number of successful decades, the company suffered a crisis in the 1970s, although it was only to be a short one. The Post Modernist movement’s interest in decoration and storytelling highlighted Fornasetti as an important role model. The entry of his son, Barnaba Fornasetti, into the company in 1982 was also an important event. Barnaba continued to develop his father’s iconographies, and started working as a curator in the production of exhibitions. This has resulted in a diversity of Fornasetti exhibitions all over the world, including a major retrospective exhibition at the Victoria & Albert in London in 1991–1992. After Piero’s death in 1988, Barnaba took over creative responsibility, and this remains the case to this day.

The title of the exhibition, FORNASETTI Inside Out Outside In, refers to the flowing creativity and rich imagination within the artist, but also to the way he applies technical proficiency to process his visions and depict the modern reality. This dual movement is a central feature of Fornasetti’s entire artistic work.

The exhibition opens at Artipelag on June 14th, 2019 and will continue until January 26th, 2020. The exhibition is a collaboration between Artipelag and Fornasetti.

Press

Press images can be found here >>

Press Contact

Gustav Idhammar, gustav.idhammar@artipelag.se, tel +46 (0)70-710 53 55

About Artipelag
Artipelag is a world-class meeting place where art shows, cultural activities, architecture, music, events, Swedish design, and good food are presented alongside the beautiful Stockholm Archipelago. Artipelag is located at Hålludden, on Värmdö – about 20 minutes by car from Stockholm city centre. The building is 10,220m2 and is carefully placed among pine trees and cliffs with magnificent views over Baggensfjärden. Artipelag was designed by the late architect Johan Nyrén.

Margiela, the Hermès years exhibition extended to Sunday, April 28th 2019

The Margiela, the Hermès years exhibition, which was originally set to close on Sunday March 10th 2019, is now being extended until April 28th, 2019. Artipelag’s opening hours will increase to accomodate this extension, with additional shuttle bus services during museum opening days.

Effective immediately, Artipelag will also open on Tuesday. Consquently, Artipelag’s only day of closure is now Monday. The shuttle buses from Vasagatan (which previously only ran on Saturdays and Sundays) will now depart every day from Tuesday to Sunday.

“It’s always a pleasure to be able to extend an exhibition as popular as Margiela, the Hermès years to give more people the opportunity to experience the creations Martin Margiela designed for Hermès,” says Artipelag’s Art Director Bo Nilsson.

The exhibition is a retrospective of the groundbreaking collaboration between avant-garde designer Martin Margiela and Parisian house Hermès from 1997 to 2003. A collaboration that ultimately proved to be as successful as it was astonishing when first announced.

Press

Press images can be found here >>

Press Contact

Gustav Idhammar, gustav.idhammar@artipelag.se, tel +46 (0)70-710 53 55

About Artipelag
Artipelag is a world-class meeting place where art shows, cultural activities, architecture, music, events, Swedish design, and good food are presented alongside the beautiful Stockholm Archipelago. Artipelag is located at Hålludden, on Värmdö – about 20 minutes by car from Stockholm city centre. The building is 10,220m2 and is carefully placed among pine trees and cliffs with magnificent views over Baggensfjärden. Artipelag was designed by the late architect Johan Nyrén.

Artipelag is showcasing the groundbreaking collaboration between Hermès and Martin Margiela

Photo left: Anders Erdström, Maison Martin Margiela A/W 1996-1997.
Photo right: Studio des Fleurs, Hermès A/W 1998-1999.

Artipelag is devoting its autumn and winter season to a retrospective of one of the most remarkable collaborations in fashion: when cutting-edge Belgian designer Martin Margiela teamed up with Hermès, a Parisian house with a time-honoured heritage.

Between 1997 and 2003, Martin Margiela was appointed by Jean-Louis Dumas, the CEO of Hermès at the time, as artistic director of the Parisian house women’s ready-to-wear collections. This collaboration turned out to be one of the most exciting in fashion history, and it is now presented in the exhibition Margiela, The Hermès Years.

Martin Margiela launched his own fashion house, Maison Martin Margiela, in 1988, and the enigmatic and inscrutable designer soon revealed himself to be the antithesis of superstar designers. Margiela’s deconstruction of traditional fashion concepts in favour of a more artistic approach has established a reputation as one of the most avant-garde faces of the fashion industry. Hermès, on the other hand, was founded in 1837. Comfort, timelessness, sensuality and authenticity are the key words which define his vision of the Hermès woman.

On the surface, one could imagine that a collaboration between Margiela and Hermès would be surprising, but Margiela proved to be a masterful interpreter of the Hermès DNA. In stark contrast to the fashion world’s fixation on eternal youth, his point of departure was the natural, self-confident woman. Margiela dressed women in genuine materials and employed the classic art of tailoring to articulate the architecture of the individual styles. The result was a remarkable fusion of the Margiela’s iconoclasm and Hermès’ timeless quality.

Margiela, The Hermès Years was originally curated by Kaat Debo and Martin Margiela, for the MoMu (Fashion Museum Antwerp) in 2017. Creations from Martin Margiela’s own label and his designs for Hermès are juxtaposed as two different translations of the same vision. The display features a succession of themed sequences with over 100 outfits, photographs and short films in a circuit in which Hermès orange interacts with the white of the Maison Martin Margiela. This helps visitors to understand the creative process that navigates seamlessly between the two houses and their identities.

The exhibition will be on display at Artipelag from October 26th 2018 to April 28th 2019.

Press Images

Press images can be found here >>

Press Contact

Gustav Idhammar, gustav.idhammar@artipelag.se, tel +46 (0)70-710 53 55

About Artipelag
Artipelag is a world-class meeting place where art shows, cultural activities, architecture, music, events, Swedish design, and good food are presented alongside the beautiful Stockholm Archipelago. Artipelag is located at Hålludden, on Värmdö – about 20 minutes by car from Stockholm city centre. The building is 10,220m2 and is carefully placed among pine trees and cliffs with magnificent views over Baggensfjärden. Artipelag was designed by the late architect Johan Nyrén.

Sculpture exhibition opens at Artipelag

This summer, Artipelag expands its artistic offering.The main exhibition, Bloomsbury Spirit, which is currently on show inside the art gallery, is now complemented by an outdoor exhibition called Detour.Here, the forests, meadows and water provide a natural backdrop for the sculptures. Visitors have the opportunity to explore the magnificent setting and how it interacts with the artwork.

Since its inception six years ago, Artipelag has established itself as an art museum with a special relationship with nature. The museum building’s sedum roof, tarred wooden walls and large panoramic windows all speak of an openness to the outside world. Thus, we usually describe our art gallery as a “green room”, a kind of greenhouse for art.

Nature has become a prominent part of Artipelag’s philosophy of art. Several of our exhibitions have focused on different aspects of the Nordic romantic tradition. Platsens själ (Genius Loci), Ingen människa är en ö (No Man is an Island) and Earth Matters are just a few examples. We’ve also had Bigert & Bergström’s I stormens öga (The Eye of the Storm), which focused on ecology and sustainability. By arranging an outdoor art installation, we’ve taken a new step towards exploring the symbiosis between art and nature.

 

Here, neither the Swedish title, Omvägar, nor the English title, Detour, revolves around roadworks or an obstacle to reaching the goal. For us, these words are associated with positive experiences, such as interesting diversions and unusual moments that we may have experienced when travelling.
– Bo Nilsson, Director of Artipelag.

Each of the artists participating in the first part of Detour has a special relationship with nature, and their work is characterised by an ability to see a living creature in it. But while they share this ability, their works are markedly different from each other in terms of approach, material choice and size (the exhibits range from 50 cm to 10 m tall).

Most of the artists are Swedish and include Charlotte Gyllenhammar, Maria Miesenberger and Kennet Williamsson. Our neighbouring Nordic countries are represented by Per Kirkeby, Tal R and Idun Baltzersen. Even though Eva Schlegel and Jaume Plensa may not have a direct link to Nordic identity, they do have a relationship with the Nordic romantic tradition and approach to nature.

The exhibition will be in a constant transformation: some works will have a long exhibition life, while others will be replaced by new ones. The purpose of this is to create a particular dynamic in our surroundings and in the art experience.

By placing Detour beyond the architectural boundaries of the building, it’s an exhibition that is continuously evolving. It explores the relationship between art and nature, and invites you to discover the area surrounding Artipelag. It implies both a physical journey and a fictional landscape, and beckons you to embark on an intricate quest to explore the human aspect of the landscape. It’s a detour off the beaten track, where you can come across everything from geology to biology, astronomy to holistic world views.

About the exhibition

Contributing artists in 2018 are Idun Baltzersen, Joel Fisher, Charlotte Gyllenhammar, Per Kirkeby, Klara Kristalova, Maria Miesenberger, Lars Nilsson, Jaume Plensa, Tal R, Eva Schlegel, Ulrika Sparre and Kennet Williamsson.

Detour opened on June 7 and closes on November 4.

More information and tickets >>

Press Contact

Gustav Idhammar, gustav.idhammar@artipelag.se, tel +46 (0)70-710 53 55

About Artipelag
Artipelag is a world-class meeting place where art shows, cultural activities, architecture, music, events, Swedish design, and good food are presented alongside the beautiful Stockholm Archipelago. Artipelag is located at Hålludden, on Värmdö – about 20 minutes by car from Stockholm city centre. The building is 10,220m2 and is carefully placed among pine trees and cliffs with magnificent views over Baggensfjärden. Artipelag was designed by the late architect Johan Nyrén.

Fredrik Roos Foundation in Cooperation with Artipelag

On March 28th, 2018, Fredrik Roos would have been 67 years old and for that reason, on this day we remember his great contribution to contemporary art – now manifested in the foundation bearing his name. The Fredrik Roos Foundation allocates a scholarship annually and this year it will amount to SEK 600,000 – making it one of Sweden’s largest. The scholarship, now being awarded for the seventh time, has previously been presented at the Modern Museum in Malmö where the scholarship exhibitions also have been presented. This year sees the presentation ceremony and exhibition moves to Artipelag in Stockholm.

In close collaboration with the country’s five art schools, two graduates from each respective school are nominated. The foundation then designates one or more fellows who receive a scholarship for artistic education in the form of further education or travel opportunities. The scholarship has a high prestige factor, not least because the fellow’s work is exhibited at an established art institution.

The Fredrik Roos Foundation scholarship has previously been awarded to artists such as Paul Fägerskiöld (2013) and Idun Baltzersen (2015).

This year, the scholarship will be presented at Artipelag in Stockholm’s archipelago on Thursday, September 27th and the accompanying exhibition will take place here.

“We are thrilled that the foundation has chosen Artipelag as a place for Fredrik Roos’ scholarship. For us, this will be an opportunity to show the very best of the younger generation of artists” – Bo Nilsson (Art Director)

Recipients of these scholarships should be “artists who – in the spirit of Fredrik Roos himself – are prepared to take risks in their artistry. One who believes in himself and who has his own unique expression. The artist should be no more than 35 years old, come from a Nordic country, and preferably work with painting and/or sculpture”.

“As an entrepreneur, Fredrik had a penchant for change. This property is a place that we as a foundation are constantly inspired by and we are looking forward to working with Artipelag. Our hope is that this new location will further strengthen the focus on the fellows and their artistry,” said Axel Roos (Chairman of the Foundation and grandson of Fredrik Roos).

In connection with the grant award, a catalog with works by this year’s recipients will be published. This year’s recipients will be announced after the summer.

Links

Fredrik Roos press photo >>
Fredrik Roos Foundation website >>

Press Contact

Gustav Idhammar, Artipelag, gustav.idhammar@artipelag.se, tel +46 (0)70 710 53 55

About Artipelag
Artipelag is a world-class meeting place where art shows, cultural activities, architecture, music, events, Swedish design, and good food are presented alongside the beautiful Stockholm Archipelago. Artipelag is located at Hålludden, on Värmdö – about 20 minutes by car from Stockholm city centre. The building is 10,220m2 and is carefully placed among pine trees and cliffs with magnificent views over Baggensfjärden. Artipelag was designed by the late architect Johan Nyrén.

All aspects of the Bloomsbury group are on display in next year’s grand exhibition at Artipelag

Artipelag is to be the first in Sweden to present an extensive exhibition of the mythical British Bloomsbury group. Bloomsbury Spirit is based on the group’s boldness, optimism and anti-authoritarian approach and inspires new ways of thinking. To showcase their inclusive modernism, the creative range of painting, photography, interior design, textiles, patterns, literature, furniture design, books, graphics, dance, garden art and fashion will be represented. Bloomsbury Spirit runs between March 23rd and September 30th, 2018.

One of the exhibition’s rooms is transformed into a gallery of paintings by Roger Fry, Vanessa Bell and Duncan Grant in a layout and environment characterized by exactly the ideals they revolted against. Another room is dedicated to Omega Workshops, a studio that was started by the same trio where they, together with other artists, designed furniture, clothing and furnishings.

An important venue that will be recreated is Charleston, Vanessa Bell’s summer house in Sussex, which became the hub of the entire Bloomsbury group. At Artipelag’s entrance courtyard, before even entering the art gallery, visitors walk through a Charleston-inspired garden that continues in the gallery, complete with ivy, roses and boxwood.

The exhibition discusses the Bloomsbury group’s utopias, such as the overall conversation, Gesamtkunstwerk and nudity. The Cadena Café, which Omega Workshops renovated in London in 1917, is recreated and will function as a reading room and gathering place.

About the Bloomsbury Group

The Bloomsbury group’s ideas, characterized by immigration, fundamentalism, salvation and violence, challenge us as much in our own time as in they did in the early 1900s.

By the time of the First World War, Sweden was isolated, and it wasn’t until the thirties that modernism broke through. It was a technical, “hard modernism” that became prominent, and with the Stockholm exhibition in 1930, rational functionalism was the political sway of the new Swedish welfare society. The Bloomsbury group, on the other hand, stood for an alternative, a third way: “soft modernism”. The group’s attitude was soft, open and flexible. Its style was bold and pluralistic rather than uniform, hard and shiny.

The group consisted of a loose collection of authors, artists, politicians, economists, historians, critics, mathematicians. At first, they were just friends and students, but later on  they broke through as their time’s new thinkers – Virginia Woolf, John Maynard Keynes, Vanessa Bell, Duncan Grant, Lytton Strachey, Roger Fry, Clive Bell, E.M. Forster and Leonard Woolf. Other more peripheral members were, for example, Bertrand Russell, Ottoline Morrell and Vita Sackville-West.

The members loathed heroism and authority. For them, modernism meant that old and new could be put together in any conceivable patterns and combinations. They celebrated imagination, feeling and creation without rejecting reason. Their crossing of boundaries was a matter of course because, according to them, the meaning of life was discussion, friendship, truth-seeking and aesthetics. It was this that was specifically human.

The group got its name from the London district of Bloomsbury where they were originally based. During World War I, many of them moved to the countryside and practised a counterurbanization lifestyle. Many of the houses are derelict today, but Charleston farm in Sussex remains as a Bloomsbury jewel, characterized by the aesthetics typical of the group: a rough-around-the-edges environment for creative work, play and discussion crossing all boundaries. A slightly chaotic, inclusive atmosphere, where inside and out come together, where everything (worn out or modern, newly built or classical) could be recycled and transformed with a lick of paint. Acrobats and painted sculptures hang on doorposts interspersed with abstract ornaments. And then a burst of flowers – brushed or printed, in wreaths or still life. Or real. In Charleston’s garden, the same gentle and courageous aesthetics as indoors are found. The whole environment was an affront to established norms.

In addition to books, exhibitions and buzzing conversations, the Bloomsbury group ran important networks – the Hogarth Press, the first to introduce Modernist Literature in England, and Omega Workshops, a collective artist workshop and showroom for all of the art of the time, such as painting, textile, design, dance, fashion and decorations.

The radicalism of the Bloomsbury group was based on the fact that everything (except their existential goals) could and should be tried and tested. They ignored conventions. Ideas and creations were central. For the arts were the essence of life and never tools for other purposes. This included Keynes, who in Sweden is mainly known as a world-leading economist. But he was also a passionate hedonist, culture politician and art connoisseur.

The playful attitude and lifestyle of the Bloomsburg group challenges Swedish social morality, where the arts have always been inferior to specialists, social engineers, function and utility.

The greatest artist was Virginia Woolf. She was an author, critic and entomologist. She was also a feminist and heavily involved in the international, modernist paintings, presented by Roger Fry to a shocked London audience at two major post-impressionist exhibitions in 1910 and 1912. Virginia Woolf described them as a catalyst for “a whole new era”.

Bloomsberries have become idols who advocate feminism, sexual freedom, pacifism and intellectual gluttony in everything from science and society to art. But over the years they have also received much criticism – they haven’t fitted into any mold. In retrospect, you can see that they introduced a much more liberal modernism than that preached in the German Bauhaus of the same period, and that they lived according to the ideals of the French Revolution. They were the best of European enlightenment traditions, while at the same time, and in contrast to us today, believing in the future.

About the Exhibition

External curator for the exhibition is the art critic and author Ingela Lind in collaboration with Artipelag’s art department, consisting of director Bo Nilsson, curator Frida Andersson, digital producer and designer Samuel Lind, chief engineer Johan von Geijer, and Kristina Lindemann, pedagogy and program manager. The design of the gardens is by Ia Schildt and the exhibition’s fashion has been created together with Cay Bond.

Next spring, Ingela Lind releases her new book, Ta sig frihet – Bloomsburygruppen, Indien och konsten att leva, “To Take the Liberty – The Bloomsbury Group, India and the Art of Living” (Albert Bonniers Förlag, will be released on March 23rd, 2018) in which she analyzes the group’s alternative and free modernism. Previously, Ingela has written Leka med modernismen – Virginia Woolf och Bloomsburygruppen, “Playing with Modernism – Virginia Woolf and the Bloomsbury Group” (Albert Bonniers Förlag, 2008).

For Bloomsbury Spirit, Artipelag has loaned unique works by, among others, Vanessa Bell, Duncan Grant and Roger Fry from English institutions such as the TATE, Victoria & Albert Museum, Courtauld Gallery, The Charleston Trust and the National Portrait Gallery.

Links

Exhibition presentation, website >>
Press photos, press room >>
The Bloomsbury Group on wikipedia >>

Press Contact

Gustav Idhammar, Artipelag, gustav.idhammar@artipelag.se, tel +46 (0)70-710 53 55

About Artipelag
Artipelag is a world-class meeting place where art shows, cultural activities, architecture, music, events, Swedish design, and good food live side by side with the beautiful archipelago environment. Artipelag is located at Hålludden, which itself is situated on Värmdö, about 20 minutes by car from Stockholm city centre. The building comprises 10,220 m² and is carefully placed among pines and cliffs with magnificent views over Baggensfjärden. Artipelag was designed by the late architect Johan Nyrén.

Creative take on the climate in the upcoming exhibition by artist duo Bigert & Bergström

Recently, the Swedish duo Bigert & Bergström went viral as images of their egg-shaped sauna, Solar Egg, made international headlines. Now their first large-scale solo exhibition, Eye of the Storm, is opening on October 27th at the art gallery Artipelag in Stockholm.

The exhibition consists of interactive installations, mechanical sculptures and films created by the Swedish artist-duo Mats Bigert and Lars Bergström. Eye of the Storm features works looking at the theme of weather and climate and how it threatens and affects the human race – an ongoing theme in their 30 year long careers.

Through the works, visitors can follow the different phases of Bigert & Bergström and their contribution to the Swedish and international art scenes. Eye of the Storm is an exhibition that moves the senses and invites viewers to participate actively. Bigert & Bergström take their starting point from scientific theories and historical events. They create a willful access point to complex issues where creativity and science merge visually.

The exhibition builds on our awareness that natural disasters are something physical and intrusive. How the comfortable can suddenly be turned into something threatening. Extreme natural events are experienced and contemplated during the exhibition at Artipelag. What thoughts go through your head when it disappears in a cloud of steam? And how does it really feel to stand in the eye of the storm?

Bigert & Bergström’s works are like a centrifuge, a rolling point of intersection between man, nature and technology. Their art reflects on deep time as well as the volatile prognosis for tomorrow. In their new installation, The Weather – a Synoptic Battlefield, historical turning points are materialized as sculptural weather maps. They show, amongst other examples, how Napoleon’s attacking forces were severely depleted by the Russian winter in 1812; and how the typhoon Kamikaze saved Japan from a Mongolian invasion in 1281.

In 1986, Bigert & Bergström met at the Stockholm Royal Academy of Art. Since then, they have created a variety of projects, large-scale installations, sculptures and films. In Sweden, they are best known for their large-scale installations such as The Climate Chambers and Tomorrow’s Weather at the Stockholm Central Station, which consists of hanging clusters of atmospheric molecules that change colour depending on the weather forecast for the following day. Also, their much talked about art piece that covered the southern tip of Sweden’s highest mountain, Kebnekaise, with a rescue blanket preventing it from melting. Recently, their egg-shaped sauna Solar Egg received international attention in art, design and architecture press.

Artipelag believes that the work of Bigert & Bergström highlights a current and important topic. They don’t just make us reflect on how humans attack their own climate, but also show the human obsession over controlling it at the same time. The duo exposes the red thread that runs between the increasingly frequent climate disasters and our air-conditioned malls where the temperature is controlled to within tenths of a degree.

As well as guided tours and introductions to the exhibition, young people and children will be able to attend workshops. Participants can engage in creative activities about future scenarios and social solutions to the challenges posed by climate change. In keeping with the spirit of the exhibition, Artipelag will offer free direct buses from Vasagatan in Stockholm on weekends.

Links

High-resolution press images from Artipelag’s press room >>
The exhibition on Artipelag’s website >>
Bigert & Bergström webpage >>
Teaser video >>

Press contact

Gustav Idhammar, Artipelag, gustav.idhammar@artipelag.se, tel +46 (0)70-710 53 55

About Artipelag
Artipelag is a world-class meeting place where art shows, cultural activities, architecture, music, events, Swedish design, and good food live side by side with the beautiful archipelago environment. Artipelag is located at Hålludden, which itself is situated on Värmdö, about 20 minutes by car from Stockholm city centre. The building comprises 10,220sqm and is carefully placed among pines and cliffs with magnificent views over Baggensfjärden. Artipelag was designed by the late architect Johan Nyrén.

Extra Exhibition This Summer: Bård Breivik – Score for a Longer Conversation

From July 8th to August 20th, 2017, Bård Breivik – Score for a Longer Conversation will be displayed in the Artipelag Artbox. The exhibition is comprised of 132 organically-shaped sculptures from a project the Norwegian artist worked on throughout his entire professional life. The sculptures, which are made using varying techniques and materials from all over the world, engage many of our senses and reflect an interest in people’s relationship to nature and handicrafts. Bård Breivik – Score for a Longer Conversation complements the current Morandi / Edmund de Waal exhibition, which is being shown throughout Summer 2017 in the Artipelag Art Gallery.

Bård Breivik (b.1948, d.2016) began his work on Score for a Longer Conversation in the early 1980’s and continued it throughout his entire professional life. The process was developed in collaboration between Breivik and craftsmen from dozens of countries and cultures. Together, they explored the creation of the project as a process and each tool’s many different possibilities.

Each individual work is evidence of a true curiosity of the unknown and has been created using traditional handicraft techniques and local materials. The canoe or cocoon-like form that recurs repeatedly throughout the exhibition emphasises the materials used, but the work as a whole underlines a rich cultural diversity and is, in a way, a kind of anthropological study of how people around the world created their own distinctive aesthetics based on local traditions, tools, and techniques.

”Many have called it a boat shape. It’s a natural association, but what I wanted to convey was, in fact, the aura that surrounds a person – their energy field.
– Bård Breivik

In the exhibition, the sculptures are displayed vertically but are not organised by year, technique, or region. Instead, they are presented as an eclectic mix, a kind of symphony of expression. The shape and size of the sculptures combine with the cultural diversity and material richness of the project in a way that implies the possibility of universal dialogue. This idea is reinforced by the sculptures being placed in old containers previously used in international shipping. The containers symbolise a truly optimistic view of the opportunities for global cooperation.

Bård Breivik was born and raised in Bergen on Norway’s west coast. After his studies at the Bergen Art and Design College – and later at St. Martin’s School of Art in London – Breivik developed a successful artistic career and was, for a short time, a professor of sculpture at the Royal Institute of Fine Arts in Stockholm. Breivik’s works have been shown at many solo and group exhibitions both in Norway and internationally. Among other notable moments, he represented Norway at the Venice Biennial in 1986 and at the São Paolo Biennial in 1991. Breivik also created several public works of art in the Nordic region.

Bård Breivik – Score for a Longer conversation is shown in parallel with Morandi / Edmund de Waal. Despite their differences, the three artists have several things in common – in particular, their interest in handicrafts. Both exhibits show how repetition can serve as a fundamental force in creation and serve to remind us of the history and memories that remain in all objects.

Grand Opening

The exhibition will open on Saturday, July 8th, 2017. Opening times are 11am to 5pm with an introduction by Sune Nordgren at 2pm.

Entrance and Tours

Those who want to see both exhibitions while visiting Artipelag can do so through a discounted combo ticket. The combo option includes oral introductions to both exhibitions.

Links

Press photos can be found in Artipelag’s press room >>
The exhibition on Artipelag’s website >>

Press Contact

Gustav Idhammar, Artipelag, gustav.idhammar@artipelag.se, tel +46 (0)70-710 53 55

About Artipelag
Artipelag is a world-class meeting place where art shows, cultural activities, architecture, music, events, Swedish design, and good food live side by side with the beautiful archipelago environment. Artipelag is located at Hålludden, which itself is situated on Värmdö, about 20 minutes by car from Stockholm city centre. The building comprises 10,220sqm and is carefully placed among pines and cliffs with magnificent views over Baggensfjärden. Artipelag was designed by the late architect Johan Nyrén.

Edmund de Waal
Giorgio Morandi

The 7th of April is the opening of Artipelag’s major summer exhibition 2017. Contemporary artist and writer Edmund de Waal meets renowned Italian painter Giorgio Morandi, whose oeuvre largely consists of still life paintings of pottery. However, it is not ceramics that unites the two artists, but rather the encouragement of mindful viewing and contemplation.

Giorgio Morandi (1890–1964) is one of the great protagonists of modern Italian art. Morandi has assumed cult status, especially within circles of art connoisseurs, and has been described as the artists’ artist. Transgressing generations, Morandi has inspired artists, authors, poets, designers and photographers and continues to do so to this day. Filmmakers and presidents can also be added to the list, where Federico Fellini’s classic La Dolce Vita is one of the more illustrious examples, as is Barack Obama’s inclusion of two Morandi paintings in the White House collection.

To name a few examples, Giorgio Morandi was showcased at Tate Modern in London, 2001. This exhibition then toured to Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris the following year. The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York also dedicated a solo show to Morandi in 2008. Morandi has never been substantially showcased in Sweden, nor in the Scandinavian region.

The exhibition at Artipelag highlights fifty works from Morandi’s career, produced between 1921 to 1963. A significant portion of the Morandi paintings featured in the exhibition are still life paintings of ceramic household items. However a handful of landscape paintings are also included. The paintings are complemented by drawings, etchings and watercolors, which illustrate Morandi’s artistic range.

Morandi led a domestic and routine bound life. He rarely left his hometown Bologna, where he lived most of his life with his mother and three sisters. Morandi also served as a Professor at the Accademia di Belle Arti di Bologna for 26 years. His motifs are likewise recurring – where similar still lifes and landscapes constitute the vast majority of his oeuvre, well over a thousand oil paintings in total.

Over half of the Morandi works shown in the exhibition at Artipelag, are generously lent to us by Museo d’Arte Moderna di Bologna.

Edmund de Waal (b. 1964) is a British artist and writer. To a Swedish audience, de Waal is known for his best-selling novel The Hare with Amber Eyes, which has been translated into over 28 languages. In The Hare with Amber Eyes, de Waal explores the rise of his aristocratic Jewish family in the late 1800s, as well as their subsequent fall inflicted by the ravages of the Nazis. On the international art scene, de Waal is known for his large-scale installations of porcelain vessels, which are informed by his passion for architecture, space and sound.

De Waal’s works have been exhibited internationally at institutions such as the Royal Academy of Arts in London, Kunsthistorisches Museum in Vienna and Gagosian Gallery in London and Los Angeles. Last year he collaborated with contemporary Chinese artist Ai Weiwei in a project at Kunsthaus Graz in Graz, Austria. Characteristic for de Waal’s installations is a shifting focus that moves from each object to the series of objects, the space that is left between, and how the viewer’s gaze flows through the artwork.

This exhibition is de Waal’s first in Sweden and will feature close to thirty works, made between 2013 and 2017. The exhibition will also include several new works made in response to Morandi, whom de Waal has often cited as a key artistic inspiration. Furthermore, de Waal will produce a text piece about Morandi, written directly onto the gallery walls of Artipelag.

”Perhaps it is assumed that the unifying link between Morandi and de Waal is the ceramic objects. However, that is not the case. Neither of the artists is particularly fascinated by the objects themselves, but rather by the contexts and presentation of them. What is of interest is how the objects are brought together, where they are placed, from where they can be viewed and how they are illuminated or darkened.”
– Bo Nilsson, Artistic Director of Artipelag.

”The Wunderkammer, which is de Waal’s point of departure and the still life works of Morandi, are related to a historical tradition of contemplating the still lives of objects, and how they have been perceived then and now. The artists share an artistic approach revolving around contemplation as the main principle, in contrast to our present time where refection and repetition rarely are valued and appreciated.”
– Bo Nilsson.

The exhibition will be on view at Artipelag from April 7th until the 1st of October, 2017 and is curated by Bo Nilsson in collaboration with Edmund de Waal.

In addition to the exhibition, Artipelag will produce a catalogue with texts by Bo Nilsson, Edmund de Waal, Norwegian Art Professor Jorunn Veiteberg and Swedish author Fredrik Sjöberg.

To coincide with the exhibition Edmund de Waals latest book The White Road (Den vita vägen) will be published in Swedish by Bromberg’s Publishing House on March 29th. In the book, de Waal writes about the thousand-year history of porcelain and its journey from China to the rest of the world. Reviews of The White Road have been written in, amongst others, The Los Angeles Times, The New Yorker and The Wall Street Journal.

Press Preview

A press preview is held on Wednesday the 5th of April, Edmund de Waal and Bo Nilsson will present. To apply for press accreditation, please contact gustav.idhammar@artipelag.se.

Links

Exhibition presentation, website >>
Press photos, press room >>
Edmund de Waal website >>
The exhibition’s video teaser >>

Press Contact

Gustav Idhammar, Artipelag, gustav.idhammar@artipelag.se, tel +46 (0)70-710 53 55

About Artipelag
Artipelag is a unique meeting place where art exhibitions, cultural activities, architecture, music, event facilities, Swedish design and excellent food live side-by-side with the beautiful archipelago environment. Artipelag is located at Hålludden which is on Värmdö – approximately 20 minutes by car from downtown Stockholm. The building covers 10 220 square meters and is gently placed amongst pine trees and cliffs with grand views of Baggensfjärden. Artipelag was designed by the late architect Johan Nyrén.

Lars Wallin – Fashion Stories

November 4, 2016 – March 12, 2017

Starting on November 4th, Artipelag will be bringing a bit of light to the winter darkness with an exhibition by Lars Wallin entitled “Fashion Stories”. Nearly 200 of the famous fashion designer’s stunning creations will be on display and visitors will be able to follow the creative process all the way from idea to sketch and finally to couture completion. This exhibition at Artipelag will be a tribute to Lars Wallin’s 25 years as a designer and will include many of his latest dresses and costumes that have never been seen before.

Lars Wallin – Fashion Stories showcases unique creations in exclusive materials from throughout Wallin’s entire career as a fashion designer. The exhibition highlights one of the few Swedish designers who works with fashion on a high artistic level with a focus on craftsmanship and quality.

Lars Wallin is best known for his glamourous party and wedding dresses in classic designs – with attitude (Crown Princess Victoria and Princess Madeleine of Sweden both wore his creations at a Nobel Prize banquet)! Throughout his career, Wallin has provided designs for Loreen, The Royal Swedish Opera, Carola, Jill Johnson and Lena PH – among others. Spring 2016’s Eurovision Final saw TV host Petra Mede dressed in a Lars Wallin creation!

The exhibition is based around 4 themes – crafts, fashion, bridal, and stage. Lars Wallin has personally selected works that mean a lot to him and in addition to ready-made garments, visitors can see sketches, toiles, jewellery, and even feel the fabrics. The idea behind this interaction is to create an understanding of the craft and design process, and to provide an insight into the work done within the studio.
“To be able to celebrate Lars Wallin’s 25 years as a designer at Artipelag is a huge honour. Several of our exhibitions have had an element of fashion, but this is the first time we will be showing a streamlined fashion exhibition. I look forward to presenting the craft in a new way and filling our art gallery with beautiful creations. We aim to combine fashion and design with our own unique environment and to provide visitors with a total aesthetic experience” – Riita Östberg, CEO of Artipelag.

Lars hopes that the exhibition will tickle the visitor’s imagination, inspire others to dare to express themselves, and to encourage timeless and durable fashion design.

Lars Wallin – Fashion Stories premiered at Prince Eugene’s Waldemarsudde in 2011 and has since toured many museums and art galleries throughout Sweden. Now the tour has finally returned to Stockholm and will be displayed at Artipelag from November 4, 2016 until March 12, 2017.

“Returning the exhibition to Stockholm after 5 years away is a great way to close the circle. I hope many new visitors will attend, as well as past attendees – the exhibition now has many new features previously unseen that would make a second viewing well worth it!” – Lars Wallin.

Lars Wallin was born in 1965 in Västerås. His career gained significant momentum in the mid-90’s when, after completion of training at the Beckmans Institute of Design in Stockholm, it was not long before Lars received the 1995 Women’s World Gold Medal Award. From there, Lars’ work broadened to include jewellery, menswear, and collaborations with different actors. Since the beginning, his drive and inspiration has been to combine French art and aesthetics with American commercialism and frivolity.

Press Photos

You are welcome to download from our press room >>

Press Contact

Gustav Idhammar, gustav.idhammar@artipelag.se, tel +46 (0) 72 080 1053

About Artipelag

Artipelag is a unique meeting place where art exhibitions, cultural activities, architecture, music, event facilities, Swedish design and excellent food live side-by-side with the beautiful archipelago environment. Artipelag is located at Hålludden which is on Värmdö – approximately 20 minutes by car from downtown Stockholm. The building, which was designed by the late architect Johan Nyrén, covers 10,220 square meters and is gentle placed among pine trees and cliffs with grand views of Baggensfjärden. In addition to cultural activities and nature experiences, Artipelag also offers excellent dining experiences in two restaurants with outdoor terraces, as well as conference facilities, a design shop, and an Artbox of 1200 square meters suitable for events, concerts, conferences, parties, launches, and video recordings.