Semla buns, Artipelag

Semla Buns at Bådan Café & Pâtisserie

Friday January 6th 2019 was the premiere day of our homemade semla buns at Bådan Café & Pâtisserie. The season is now over, but semla buns will be served again during the same period in 2019.

Annie Hesselstad – our pastry chef and member of the Swedish National Culinary Team – will be baking these delicious pastries from scratch with flour of the highest quality. The sweet almond filling is made from roasted almonds which together with cardamom gives the semla bun its rich flavour. We dust the top of each bun with icing sugar and the creamy whipped cream inside is, of course, ecological. The result is what we would argue is one of both Värmdö and Stockholm’s best buns!

Semla buns are available in two sizes: small (SEK 28) and large (SEK 45). Lactose-free variants are available, but unfortunately not gluten-free.

About Semla Buns

Semla buns, also known as Fat Tuesday Rolls, and Shrove Buns, have a long tradition in Sweden – and many other parts of Europe. The name can be traced back to ancient times, and the variety we eat here in Sweden today began to take shape during the 1500s. The most significant local variations are found in Southern Sweden (Skåne), Finland and Estonia – though the diversity of semla variations does not come close to outstripping the number of buns themselves (in Sweden we eat about 40 million each year!)

Almond paste first appeared in semla buns during the mid-nineteenth century. Towards the end of the same century, whipped cream was added and the tradition of serving the semla buns with hot milk began to disappear. Instead, people began enjoying their buns with a cup of coffee. The buns we know today were indeed available, but it was not until the 1930s that they had spread across the country. When the Second World War had ended and the days of rationing was over, a substantial upswing in the consumption of these unique buns began – and the traditions we have now were cemented.